U.S. Intellectual History Blog

Previewing Forthcoming US Intellectual History Books

Want to feel overwhelmed? Try to keep up with the new work to be published over the next six months in US intellectual history and adjacent fields—yikes! There is so much exciting scholarship coming out, in many cases the products of groundbreaking research with extensive import on present political and social dilemmas.

I’ve done my best to pore through university press catalogs and keep track of people’s forthcoming work, but I’m sure I’ve missed some. If you know of a book slated for release in 2019 that’s not on here, please add it in the comments. (And if you’ve written one that I’ve somehow overlooked, please forgive me—no slight is intended!)

  • Jeanne E. Abrams, First Ladies of the Republic: Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Dolley Madison and the Creation of an Iconic American Role (New York University Press)
  • Adele Logan Alexander, Princess of the Hither Isles: A Black Suffragist’s Story from the Jim Crow South (Yale University Press)
  • Nathan G. Alexander, Race in a Godless World: Atheism, Race, and Civilization, 1850-1914 (New York University Press)
  • Binyamin Appelbaum, The Economists’ Hour: False Prophets, Free Markets, and the Fracture of Society (Little, Brown and Company)
  • Amy Aronson, Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life (Oxford University Press)
  • Eiichiro Azuma, In Search of Our Frontier: Japanese America and Settler Colonialism in the Construction of Japan’s Borderless Empire (University of California Press)
  • Thomas J. Balcerski, Bosom Friends: The Intimate World of William Rufus King and James Buchanan (Oxford University Press)
  • Horace Bartilow, Drug War Pathologies: Embedded Corporatism and U.S. Drug Enforcement in the Americas (University of North Carolina Press)
  • Kabria Baumgartner, In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America (New York University Press)
  • Daniel Belgrad, The Culture of Feedback: Ecological Thinking in Seventies America (University of Chicago Press)
  • Jonathan Bell, Beyond the Politics of the Closet: Gay Rights and the American State Since the 1970s (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Thomas Bender, British America, American America: The Settling and Making of the United States (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Christopher Benfey, If: The Untold Story of Kipling’s American Years (Penguin Press)
  • Nolan Bennett, The Claims of Experience: Autobiography and American Democracy (Oxford University Press)
  • Kate Bowler, The Preacher’s Wife: The Precarious Power of Evangelical Women Celebrities (Princeton University Press)
  • T. H. Breen, The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of America (Harvard University Press)
  • Vincent Brown, Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War (Harvard University Press)
  • Andrea Boyles, You Can’t Stop the Revolution: Community Disorder and Social Ties in Post-Ferguson America (University of California Press)
  • Nicholas Buccola, The Fire Is Upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate over Race in America (Princeton University Press)
  • Stephen Budiansky, Oliver Wendell Holmes: A Life in War, Law, and Ideas (W. W. Norton)
  • Brandon R. Byrd, The Black Republic: African Americans and the Fate of Haiti (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Christopher Cameron, Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (Northwestern University Press)
  • Lawrence Cappello, None of Your Damn Business: Privacy in the United States from the Gilded Age to the Digital Age (University of Chicago Press)
  • Natalia Cecire, Experimental: American Literature and the Aesthetics of Knowledge (Johns Hopkins University Press)
  • Giuliana Chamedes, A Twentieth-Century Crusade: The Vatican’s Battle to Remake Christian Europe (Harvard University Press)
  • Andrea Long Chu, Females: A Concern (Verso)
  • Elisabeth S. Clemens, Civic Gifts: Voluntarism and the Making of the American Nation-State (University of Chicago Press)
  • Lizabeth Cohen, Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Steve Conn, Nothing Succeeds Like Failure: The Sad History of American Business Schools (Cornell University Press)
  • Vaneesa Cook, Spiritual Socialists: Religion and the American Left (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Peter Coviello, Make Yourselves Gods: Mormons and the Unfinished Business of American Secularism (University of Chicago Press)
  • Nancy E. Davis, The Chinese Lady: Afong Moy in Early America (Oxford University Press)
  • Roland De Wolk, American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford (University of California Press)
  • Gerardo Con Díaz, Software Rights: How Patent Law Transformed Software Development in America (Yale University Press)
  • J. D. Dickey, American Demagogue: The Great Awakening and the Rise and Fall of Populism (Pegasus Books)
  • Gregory P. Downs, The Second American Revolution: The Civil War-Era Struggle over Cuba and the Rebirth of the American Republic (University of North Carolina Press)
  • Anna Mae Duane, Educated for Freedom: The Incredible Story of Two Fugitive Schoolboys who Grew Up to Change a Nation (New York University Press)
  • Lisa Duggan, Mean Girl: Ayn Rand and the Culture of Greed (University of California Press)
  • Thomas Dumm, Home in America: On Loss and Retrieval (Harvard University Press)
  • David J. Dzurec III, Our Suffering Brethren: Foreign Captivity and Nationalism in the Early United States (University of Massachusetts Press)
  • Mark Edwards, Faith and Foreign Affairs in the American Century (Lexington Books)
  • Douglas R. Egerton, Heirs of an Honored Name: The Decline of the Adams Family and the Rise of Modern America (Basic Books)
  • Jeffrey Einboden, Jefferson’s Muslim Fugitives: A Lost Story of Slavery and Emancipation (Oxford University Press)
  • Carol Faulkner, Unfaithful: Love, Adultery, and Marriage Reform in Nineteenth Century America (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Andrew Feffer, Bad Faith: Teachers, Liberalism, and the Origins of McCarthyism (Fordham University Press, 2019)
  • Garrett Felber, Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State (University of North Carolina Press)
  • Samuel Fleischacker, Being Me Being You: Adam Smith and Empathy (University of Chicago Press)
  • Katrina Forrester, In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy (Princeton University Press)
  • Eric Foner, The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution (W. W. Norton)
  • Laura Freidenfelds, The Myth of the Perfect Pregnancy: A History of Miscarriage in America (Oxford University Press)
  • K. Healan Gaston, Imagining Judeo-Christian America: Religion, Secularism, and the Redefinition of Democracy (University of Chicago Press)
  • Lawrence B. Glickman, Free Enterprise: An American History (Yale University Press)
  • Gary Gerstle, Nelson Lichtenstein, and Alice O’Connor, Beyond the New Deal Order: U.S. Politics from the Great Depression to the Great Recession (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Thavolia Glymph, The Women’s Fight: The Civil War’s Battles for Home, Freedom, and Nation (University of North Carolina Press)
  • Richard Godbeer, World of Trouble: A Philadelphia Quaker Family’s Journey through the American Revolution (Yale University Press)
  • Jessica Lynn Graham, Shifting the Meaning of Democracy: Race, Politics, and Culture in the United States and Brazil (University of California Press)
  • James Grant, Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian (W. W. Norton)
  • Kerri K. Greenidge, Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter (Liveright)
  • Brenna Wynn Greer, Represented: The Black Imagemakers Who Reimagined African American Citizenship (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Emily Gundelsberger, On the Clock: What Low-Wage Work Did to Me and How It Drives America Insane (Little, Brown and Company)
  • Lauren Jae Gutterman, Her Neighbor’s Wife: A History of Lesbian Desire Within Marriage (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • David D. Hall, The Puritans: A Transatlantic History (Princeton University Press)
  • Dennis Patrick Halpin, A Brotherhood of Liberty: Black Reconstruction and Its Legacies in Baltimore, 1865-1920 (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Pekka Hämäläinen, Lakota America: A New History of Indigenous Power (Yale University Press)
  • Gillis J. Harp, Protestants and American Conservatism: A Short History (Oxford University Press)
  • Emma Hart, Trading Spaces: The Colonial Marketplace and the Foundations of American Capitalism (University of Chicago Press)
  • Linda Hirshman, Reckoning: The Epic Battle Against Sexual Abuse and Harassment (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
  • Daniel G. Hummel, Covenant Brothers: Evangelicals, Jews, and U.S.-Israeli Relations (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Jonathan I. Israel, The Enlightenment that Failed: Ideas, Revolution, and Democratic Defeat, 1748-1830 (Oxford University Press)
  • Cole Jones, Captives of Liberty: Prisoners of War and the Politics of Vengeance in the American Revolution (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • LeeAnna Keith, When It Was Grand: The Radical Republican History of the Civil War (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Ibram X. Kendi, How to Be an Antiracist (One World)
  • Thomas S. Kidd, Who Is an Evangelical? The History of a Movement in Crisis (Yale University Press)
  • David P. King, God’s Internationalists: World Vision and the Age of Evangelical Humanitarianism (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • W. Kostal, Laying Down the Law: The American Legal Revolutions in Occupied Germany and Japan (Harvard University Press)
  • Alex Krieger, City on a Hill: Urban Idealism in America from the Puritans to the Present (Harvard University Press)
  • Peter J. Kuznick, Beyond the Laboratory: Scientists as Political Activists in 1930s America (University of Chicago Press)
  • Peter La Chapelle, I’d Fight the World: A Political History of Old-Time, Hillbilly, and Country Music (University of Chicago Press)
  • John Lauritz Larson, Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Carlton F. W. Larson, The Trials of Allegiance: Treason, Juries, and the American Revolution (Oxford University Press)
  • Nicholas Lemann, Transaction Man: The Rise of the Deal and the Decline of the American Dream (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Laurel Leff, Well Worth Saving: American Universities’ Life-and-Death Decisions on Refugees from Nazi Europe (Yale University Press)
  • Ariane Liazos, Reforming the City: The Contested Origins of Urban Government, 1890-1930 (Columbia University Press)
  • Lázaro Lima, Being Brown: Sonia Sotomayor and the Latino Question (University of California Press)
  • Matthew Lockwood, To Begin the World Over Again: How the American Revolution Devastated the Globe (Yale University Press)
  • Jan L. Logemann, Engineered to Sell: European Émigrés and the Making of Consumer Capitalism (University of Chicago Press)
  • Julia Lovell, Maoism: A Global History (Knopf)
  • James M. Lundberg, Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood (Johns Hopkins University Press)
  • Maddalena Marinari, Unwanted: Italian and Jewish Mobilization against Restrictive Immigration Laws, 1882–1965 (University of North Carolina Press)
  • Eugene McCarraher, The Enchantments of Mammon: How Capitalism Became the Religion of Modernity (Harvard University Press)
  • W. Caleb McDaniel, Sweet Taste of Liberty: A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America (Oxford University Press)
  • Jim McGuigan, Raymond Williams: Cultural Analyst (University of Chicago Press)
  • Marla Miller, Entangled Lives: Labor, Livelihood, and Landscapes of Change in Rural Massachusetts (Johns Hopkins University Press)
  • Sarah Milov, The Cigarette: A Political History (Harvard University Press)
  • Benjamin Moser, Sontag: Her Life and Work (Ecco)
  • Joshua M. Myers, We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989 (New York University Press)
  • Johann Neem, What’s the Point of College? Seeking Purpose in an Age of Reform (Johns Hopkins University Press)
  • Eric Nelson, The Theology of Liberalism: Political Philosophy and the Justice of God (Harvard University Press)
  • William E. Nelson, E Pluribus Unum: How the Common Law Helped Unify and Liberate Colonial America, 1607-1776 (Oxford University Press)
  • Tom Nicholas, VC: An American History (Harvard University Press)
  • Kinohi Nishikawa, Street Players: Black Pulp Fiction and the Making of a Literary Underground (University of Chicago Press)
  • Mary Beth Norton, 1774: The Long Year of Revolution (Knopf)
  • Andrew Offenburger, Frontiers in the Gilded Age: Adventure, Capitalism, and Dispossession from Southern Africa to the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880-1917 (Yale University Press)
  • Amy C. Offner, Sorting Out the Mixed Economy: The Rise and Fall of Welfare and Developmental States in the Americas (Princeton University Press)
  • Miles Ogborn, The Freedom of Speech: Talk and Slavery in the Anglo-Caribbean World (University of Chicago Press)
  • Dara Orenstein, Out of Stock: The Warehouse in the History of Capitalism (University of Chicago Press)
  • Lorena Oropeza, The King of Adobe: Reies López Tijerina, Lost Prophet of the Chicano Movement (University of North Carolina Press)
  • Orlando Patterson, The Confounding Island: Jamaica and the Postcolonial Predicament (Harvard University Press)
  • Sarah M. S. Pearsall, Polygamy: An Early American History (Yale University Press)
  • Thomas Philippon, The Great Reversal: How America Gave Up on Free Markets (Harvard University Press)
  • Lavelle Porter, The Blackademic Life: Academic Fiction, Higher Education, and the Black Intellectual (Northwestern University Press)
  • Charles Postel, Equality: An American Dilemma, 1866-1896 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Eithne Quinn, A Piece of the Action: Race and Labor in Post-Civil Rights Hollywood (Columbia University Press)
  • Sarah L. Quinn, American Bonds: How Credit Markets Shaped a Nation (Princeton University Press)
  • Ben Railton, We the People: The 500-Year Battle Over Who Is American (Rowman & Littlefield)
  • Marcus Rediker, Titas Chakraborty, and Matthias van Rossum, eds., A Global History of Runaways: Workers, Mobility, and Capitalism, 1600-1850 (University of California Press)
  • Jonathan Rée, Witcraft: The Invention of Philosophy in English (Yale University Press)
  • Tyson Reeder, Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Simon Reid-Henry, Empire of Democracy: The Remaking of the West Since the Cold War, 1971-2017 (Simon Schuster)
  • Lukas Rieppel, Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a Spectacle (Harvard University Press)
  • Strother E. Roberts, Colonial Ecology, Atlantic Economy: Transforming Nature in Early New England (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Andrew A. Robichaud, Animal City: The Domestication of America (Harvard University Press)
  • David Lindsay Roberts, Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans Through History (Johns Hopkins University Press)
  • Corey Robin, The Enigma of Clarence Thomas (Metropolitan Books)
  • L. Benjamin Rolsky, The Rise and Fall of the Religious Left: Politics, Television, and Popular Culture in the 1970s and Beyond (Columbia University Press)
  • Brian Rosenwald, Talk Radio’s America: How an Industry Took Over a Political Party That Took Over the United States (Harvard University Press)
  • Michael Rossi, The Republic of Color: Science, Perception, and the Making of Modern America (University of Chicago Press)
  • Amy Rutenberg, Rough Draft: Cold War Military Manpower and the Origins of Vietnam-Era Draft Resistance (Cornell University Press)
  • Donald Sassoon, The Anxious Triumph: A Global History of Capitalism1860-1914 (Allen Lane)
  • Jeremy Schipper and Nyasha Junior, Black Samson: The Untold Story of an American Icon (Oxford University Press)
  • Stuart Schrader, Badges without Borders: How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing (University of California Press)
  • Sarah Schrank, Free and Natural: Nudity and the American Cult of the Body (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Ethan Schrum, The Instrumental University: Education in Service of the National Agenda After World War II (Cornell University Press)
  • Matthew L. Schuerman, Newcomers: Gentrification and Its Discontents (University of Chicago Press)
  • Benjamin Sidney Michael Schwantes, The Train and the Telegraph: A Revisionist History (Johns Hopkins University Press)
  • Jonathan Scott, How the Old World Ended: The Anglo-Dutch-American Revolution 1500–1800 (Yale University Press)
  • Roy Scranton, Total Mobilization: World War II and American Literature (University of Chicago Press)
  • Mira L. Siegelberg, Statelessness: A Modern History (Harvard University Press)
  • Nancy Shoemaker, Pursuing Respect in the Cannibal Isles: Americans in Nineteenth-Century Fiji (Cornell University Press)
  • Emily Skidmore, True Sex: The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the Twentieth Century (New York University Press)
  • Rickie Solinger, The Abortionist: A Woman Against the Law, Updated 25th Anniversary Edition (University of California Press)
  • Karen M. Staller, New York’s Newsboys: Charles Loring Brace and the Founding of the Children’s Aid Society (Oxford University Press)
  • Jordan Alexander Stein, When Novels Were Books (Harvard University Press)
  • Tracy B. Strong, Learning One’s Native Tongue: Citizenship, Contestation, and Conflict in America (University of Chicago Press)
  • Matthew Avery Sutton, Double Crossed: The Missionaries Who Spied for the United States During the Second World War (Basic Books)
  • Christopher W. Shaw, Money, Power, and the People: The American Struggle to Make Banking Democratic (University of Chicago Press)
  • Benjamin Talton, In This Land of Plenty: Mickey Leland and Africa in American Politics (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership (University of North Carolina Press)
  • James Traub, What Was Liberalism? The Promise of a Noble Idea (Basic Books)
  • Harlow Giles Unger, Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call of American Independence (Da Capo Press)
  • Daniel Vaca, Evangelicals Incorporated: Books and the Business of Religion in America (Harvard University Press)
  • Robin Globus Veldman, The Gospel of Climate Skepticism: Why Evangelical Christians Oppose Action on Climate Change (University of California Press)
  • Alexis N. Walker, Divided Unions: The Wagner Act, Federalism, and Organized Labor (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • James Walvin, Freedom: The Overthrow of the Slave Empires (Pegasus Books)
  • Janek Wasserman, The Marginal Revolutionaries: How Austrian Economists Fought the War of Ideas (Yale University Press)
  • Steven White, World War II and American Racial Politics: Public Opinion, the Presidency, and Civil Rights Advocacy (Cambridge University Press)
  • Mark Wild, Renewal: Liberal Protestants and the American City after World War II (University of Chicago Press)
  • Alex Zamalin, Black Utopia: The History of an Idea from Black Nationalism to Afrofuturism (Columbia University Press)
  • Leandra Ruth Zarnow, Battling Bella: The Protest Politics of Bella Abzug (Harvard University Press)

13 Thoughts on this Post

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We ask that those who participate in the discussions generated in the Comments section do so with the same decorum as they would in any other academic setting or context. Since the USIH bloggers write under our real names, we would prefer that our commenters also identify themselves by their real name. As our primary goal is to stimulate and engage in fruitful and productive discussion, ad hominem attacks (personal or professional), unnecessary insults, and/or mean-spiritedness have no place in the USIH Blog’s Comments section. Therefore, we reserve the right to remove any comments that contain any of the above and/or are not intended to further the discussion of the topic of the post. We welcome suggestions for corrections to any of our posts. As the official blog of the Society of US Intellectual History, we hope to foster a diverse community of scholars and readers who engage with one another in discussions of US intellectual history, broadly understood.

  1. Andy,
    This is great. Thanks for poring over the catalogs so others don’t have to.

    Occurs to me that you might want to add Corey Robin’s book on Clarence Thomas, to be published in the fall. (Not that it’s something that would be at the top of my personal list necessarily, but that’s neither here nor there.)

  2. Thank you for this list, which will add to an already precarious pile of books on my nightstand!

    If you could make one more edit, however, “Spiritual Socialists” is by “Vaneesa Cook,” not “Vanessa Cook”!

  3. Thank you for this list. Black Samson: The Untold Story of an American Icon (Oxford UP 2020) is co-authored by Nyasha Junior and Jeremy Schipper rather than authored by Schipper alone.

  4. Thanks for the list! Please add:

    AT THE CENTER: AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE IN THE MID-TWENTIETH CENTURY, by Casey N. Blake, Daniel H. Borus, and Howard Brick (Rowman & Littlefield, forthcoming end 2019).

    This completes the 15-volume History of American Thought and Culture series begun by Lewis Perry in the 1980s (initially with Twayne Publishers).

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S-USIH Comment Policy

We ask that those who participate in the discussions generated in the Comments section do so with the same decorum as they would in any other academic setting or context. Since the USIH bloggers write under our real names, we would prefer that our commenters also identify themselves by their real name. As our primary goal is to stimulate and engage in fruitful and productive discussion, ad hominem attacks (personal or professional), unnecessary insults, and/or mean-spiritedness have no place in the USIH Blog’s Comments section. Therefore, we reserve the right to remove any comments that contain any of the above and/or are not intended to further the discussion of the topic of the post. We welcome suggestions for corrections to any of our posts. As the official blog of the Society of US Intellectual History, we hope to foster a diverse community of scholars and readers who engage with one another in discussions of US intellectual history, broadly understood.