Review of *Isamu Noguchi’s Modernism: Negotiating Race, Labor, and Nation, 1930-1950*

Isamu Noguchi’s Modernism: Negotiating Race, Labor, and Nation, 1930-1950 is a long-overdue, rigorous study of Japanese American sculpture artist Isamu Noguchi’s early career over the decades of the 1930s and 1940s, which respectively span the Popular Front era, World War II, and the beginning of the Cold War. In her book, Amy Lyford deftly unearths archived, uncompleted plans for sculptures and artistic structures such as Noguchi’s Monument to the Plow (1933-1934), his Carl Mackley Memorial plaster model (1935), his worker sculpture for the World’s Fair Labor Pavilion (1937) and bathing pools in the Japanese American internment camp in Poston, Arizona, Read more

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